Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Pedestaled Boulder

Those who propose that all pedestaled boulders are the result of natural forces should consider this example from Mt. Huron in northern Michigan.  I found this spectacular photo online, and have not been able to contact the fellow who took it.  The support stones are all angular with flat bottoms, and the boulder is, I believe, less than three feet long, but must weigh hundreds of pounds.


Norman

6 comments :

Tim MacSweeney said...

I right clicked the image and chose the "Search Google for this Image" option, ended up at the Aquatic Microbes Blog where I found " For the afternoon I decided to do some exploring. I hear there is a dolmen on top of Huron Mountain. So what is a Dolmen? Well I’m getting mixed answers but it seems to be related to ancient Celtic or Viking civilizations. Yes, apparently both made it to MI!!!! Way before good old Chris."

pwax said...

It is a beautiful photo.

pwax said...

The right side of the boulder is flaked; bringing the upper front corner of the rock into a point. It is reasonable to wonder: is this was part of the function?

Tim MacSweeney said...

Makes it look a little zoomorphic - did you look at the other side in the link back to the original? https://aquaticmicrobes.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/summer2012-036.jpg

Tommy Hudson said...

Interesting rock. I would love to see it in person. If it is 3' long and on average 2' square, that is approximately 12 cubic feet of stone. A good average for a cubic foot of stone is 150 lbs. that would make the stone's weight approximately 1800 lbs. What I'm thinking, is how was it done? My first thought is some sort of lever(s) and fulcrum(s) arrangment, with 7-8 people involved. The fulcrum(s) may still be laying nearby. As usual, I wonder where the nearest body of water is located in relation to the stone? Is this a staging area for _________? I also noticed the shadow of the stone gives a "projectile point" image if viewed from the top. Is it pointing to something, or is the direction of the point important? Could be. I noticed the land around the rock appears to fall away in all directions. Is it pointing to a higher elevation nearby? Pointing toward the rising/setting sun? Solstice? Interesting site.

Tommy Hudson said...

I forgot to mention that the light appears to be in the afternoon. With the shadow directly below and parallel to the rock's length, that would make it pointing west, or the setting sun. I could be 180 degrees wrong, but that would still make it pointing in a sun related direction, which of course, is east, or the rising sun. Cool site.