Thursday, August 26, 2010

Edges of Foxborough State Forest

I parked on Thurston Rd and walked in at a trail head but stayed to the left, off trail, in the woods parallel with and to the side of Thurston Rd. (I am afraid this may not be within the State Forest.) There were numerous rock piles. First I came to a large pile with a tree growing up in it, surrounded by smaller triangular piles.A first triangle:A second one that looks like it might have been hollow:A detail:Red rock and white quartz.

Another triangular pile:

So that was one little cluster of rock piles. Further along I found other things at the edge of the wetland but it was raining and I had a choice of taking pictures that were blurry:
or pictures that were masked by little points of light where the flash is hitting raindrops:Blurry:Or with an orb:Another triangle, somewhere else:Other odds and ends in the saplings and hay-scented fern:Really hard to get a decent photo in the rain.

4 comments :

Ted said...

Just a technical note: I find that a monopod really helps when the light level is low and you don't want to use a flash. I have a Komperdell hiking stick that has a detachable cork head with a tripod socket. Nice for stability both on foot and shooting. Helps when I don't have my tripod with me, just a thought...

pwax said...

It is a good thought. I wonder though, whether I could get a camera that is inherently better at low light levels - with short shutter speed even in dim rainy forest lighting.

Ted said...

Most digital cameras have an ISO "film speed" control. Default is usually "auto" meaning the camera will adjust it higher if the light is dim, but only up to a certain point. If you adjust it yourself, up to 800 or so, it might make the dim light photos shake less with a higher shutter speed. The down side is "noise" at higher ISO settings where the image gets "grainy" like the old high speed films did when you push processed them. This varies from camera to camera. Some are better at higher ISO settings than others. Reviewers are always checking this out, so you could research this pretty easily.

pwax said...

Today, in 2012, I wonder if that first pile with a tree growing out of it might have been a "rectangular pile with a hollow". You know what I mean.