Tuesday, May 22, 2007

All the springs on the hill

I swear, every place where a brook was starting with water coming out of the ground on this hill, there were rock piles. Here are some from the location marked "A":
This last example is something I think has a very particular meaning. I notice the special shape which is common to both rocks. Note also that the smaller one is in reversed position relative to the larger one. Read a more extended discussion here of this type of pile, which I call "Twins". This is a pretty nice example. I walked up the valley above "A" and kept finding more piles, then I circled around the east side, filmed a porcupine, climbed the hill and explored the hilltop. Everywhere there was water, there were rock piles. I have videos and other pics.

As I climbed up the valley above "A" I continued coming across isolated piles here and there along the water course. The piles became more distinct and more massive. I think these two are about the best examples; they were in a "final" upper valley above which I saw no further rock piles.
I started the day making little videos - too numerous and time consuming to post - about how I was venturing out into the unknown, not knowing what I would find. Starting with the drive north, continuing with the brook outflow into the pond west of "A". I then continued uphill and around to "B" and "C" shooting little videos of each discovery as it came up. Perhaps we have time for the first brook video?

Higher on the hill, at one of the other springs, were a couple of structures, a split wedged rock, a little line of rocks:I am lucky to live in a place where I can see new sites like this every weekend. But then I really wonder if there are not things like this everywhere, so it is not luck so much as simply going out to look. For what it is worth, we have a once in history opportunity right now to go out and find these places. This walk was very pleasant. It was sopping wet but it did not matter. There was a Great Horned Owl at this first site ("A") and a Porcupine on the east side of the hill. And then I kept coming across tumbled rocks and wondering if they used to be a rock piles before seeing other piles in better condition.

10 comments :

pwax said...

I guess I should point out why I think these piles are obviously ceremonial. One point is that they are made from the ledge rock, made from broken sharp edged pieces not from glacial cobbles - so these constituent rocks did not come out of a field. Another physical characteristic is the regularity in size of the constituent rocks: these were sorted, one size was selected for.

Then also the close association to water is exactly the relation we expect to see. That is enough for me but I could add that the piles are on a rocky hill which was never plowed.

Anonymous said...

Knowing where to look, such as at spring sources, helps one to zero in on cairn sites. Waterfalls, caves, etc. are also good places to look for unusual stonework. Later this week I am being shown some unusual stone rows at the Delaware Water Gap between PA and NJ, some having chambers built into them. This area is beautiful, and it was an important route and food source for the Native peoples. I'll be sending pictures for posting.

Norman

Tim MacSweeney said...

I could say much the same about where I live, "every place where a brook was starting with water coming out of the ground on this hill, there were rock piles," except that I'd say there "are lots of rows of stones creating a zone around the water features and some piles as well." The last photo reminds me of this observation but I can't tell from the photo if it continues along the brook or if it's more of a circle or something...

pwax said...

Tim: it does not continue. When I took the picture I thought it was just a short row next to the water course. Looking more carefully at the picture later, I see it may be part of a kind of outline or possibly "V" structure (something like what you described).

Anonymous said...

Peter:

The third image in this little article shows an unusual looking rock on top of a large boulder. Next to it on the right is something striated or fluted, and I can't figure out whether it is wood or rock. Do you know? It looks interesting.

Norman

Norman

pwax said...

Yes that is a rock. Unusual geology. You may not agree that the shapes (of the two rocks on top of the boulder) are important. But it certainly makes sense to pay close attention to unusual geology and I think you are correct to call attention to that smaller second rock.

JimP said...

Why wouldn't anyone agree that the shapes are important? Triangle symbolism is all over these sites -- by far the most common shape we find. Don't hold back, Peter, come right out and say it -- the shapes ARE important!

pwax said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
pwax said...

You know I think it is important. The link leads to what I think in more detail. But I was answering Norman's question and it did not seem appropriate to prosthyletize (sp?) in the middle of that.

Anonymous said...

Colors, shapes and textures of rocks were all important in the selction of rocks for cairns and other structures. At a site in AL, greenstone slabs weighing a hundred pounds or more were carried around three miles to a cairn site on a mountain. By paying attention to the types of stones in a cairn, and determining where they came from, we can learn something.

Norman